The Oxford Comma - Where Do You Stand?

You all know I’m not a writer (:slightly_smiling_face:LOL!) but the use, or not, of an Oxford comma has long confused me. Doing my Higher English, I was always told not to use it. However, it seems as if times may be changing.

What’s your opinion?

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Ahh, the old sentence -
" Panda. Large black-and-white bear-like mammal, native to China. Eats, shoots and leaves. "

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“Peace, prosperity and friendship with all nations.”

In Spanish, we would have written it exactly the same way. When enumerating, we don’t use comma before conjunctions. Only in few cases the comma would be used, being the following, some of them:

  • When the conjunction separates two sentences with different subjects (e.g. Lily stood home working, and Weeyin decided to go to the park).

  • When the conjunction introduces a new element that doesn’t belong to the preceding enumeration (e.g. He has a wonderful, deep, clear voice, and a beautiful writing ).

  • When the conjunction serves as a union between the complete preceding predicate, but not with the last element of the enumeration (e.g. She bought a pair of shoes, a dress and a bag, and went for a drink)

  • When the conjunction is equivalent to/can be substituted by “but” (e.g. I told you not to do it, and you forgot).

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Wow, Starry that is a rather involved explanation.

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And there was me thinking it was just a case of not putting a comma before the ‘and’. I didn’t realise there was so much else to it! :slightly_smiling_face:

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The text on the coin isn’t ambiguous, so there’s really no need for a serial comma.

Sir Phil has chosen a very odd battle to fight.

Unfortunately, too many people, including this writer, confuse grammar with style. Grammar rules have to be followed. Stylistic ones don’t.

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I use Oxford comma (sometimes for clarity, sometimes as a stylistic preference), and then I forget that I shouldn’t use it in my own language.

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